Talking Biz with Maps Maponyane

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A lot of us here and Im sure a lot of South Africans know Maps Maponyane as a TV personality and thats it. At the recent weekly meeting of the WeThinkCode_ entrepreneurship community called biz_tank we all got to learn more about Maps and how he is more like us rather than than your average Joe on the tube.

The event had students pitching their business ideas and getting feed back from the student panel and Maps himself along with WeThinkCode_ co-founder Arlene Mulder and then it was the turn of Maps and Arlene to pitch their own ideas.

View some videos of the event below.

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EDWARD LAWRENCE INTERVIEW

During one of the conferences which take place here at Wethinkcode_ from time to time, we had the pleasure of hosting The founder and Director of Business Development at Workonline Communications, Edward Lawrence.

At the conference the we students had the pleasure of listening and engaging with one of the top business people in South Africa and Africa as a whole.

We were also lucky enough to grab a quick interview before he dashed off to his next engagement. You can see the video below.

CELEBRATING WOMENS’ DAY

Today is Women’s Day and to celebrate this WTC_ hosted an open day for women from different walks of life. The day started off with a meet up where the women plus the few brave men who attended brainstormed and discussed the role of women in tech.

After the meet up the guests got a tour around campus and demonstrations from WTC_ students.

Some of the guests got a chance to write the WTC_ entrance exam and we look forward to have them on campus for more than one single day.

Find the pictures of all that went down below.

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WHAT WE LOST, WE CAN CODE

 

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“I’d like to know about the process one goes through when writing a book.” This is a question posed by Luthando to Moses Nzama Khaizen Mtileni, who joined us today for the Literary Arts Club Meeting. “Writing for me,” Moses began, in a slow tone heavy with accent, ”is more about my encounters with the world.” He went on to elaborate on how he writes not because he is mandated to do so, but because he feels that the there are certain things that occur in society that warrant documenting, and so he does this in the best way he knows, with a lyrical pen.

His first novel, which is written in Xitsonga and set in Kliptown, Soweto, the township that gave birth to the Freedom Charter, is an example he uses to elaborate on how he through this art is able to tell the tale of an instance where it is the victim of an injustice that forgets the unjust act and does to others what the perpetrator once did to him – a metaphor for the ANC government of date perhaps.

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